Archive for » September, 2009 «

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

A 14-year old British schoolgirl died on Monday shortly after receiving a vaccine against the human papilloma virus (HPV), the most common cause of cervical cancer. The girl was a pupil at Blue Coat Church of England School and Music College in Coventry and was given the Cervarix anti-cancer jab as part of a national programme to immunise teenage girls against cervical cancer.

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

New research presented this month at a major European Oncology meeting has shown previously untreated patients who received the targeted cancer drug Erbitux (cetuximab) along with either FOLFIRI or FOLFOX4 chemotherapy lived up to 4 months longer than patients receiving just the chemotherapy. Patients had cancers showing a particular genetic make-up that responds well to treatment.

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

Although screening for prostate cancer with the Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) test in men ages 50-70 can detect the cancer before it becomes symptomatic, knowing whether screening is beneficial for these men is uncertain. Recent trials have shown small or no reductions in prostate cancer mortality among those screened.

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

African-American men are more likely to have had a digital rectal exam in the past year to screen for prostate cancer if they engage in religious behaviors, according to a University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) study published in the American Journal of Men’s Health. Study co-author Theresa A. Wynn, Ph.D.

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

B-Cell Lymphoma Protected by SPAK Silencing A group led by Dr. Michael Teitell at UCLA has demonstrated that misregulation of the protein SPAK may contribute to B-cell lymphoma development. Their report can be found in the October 2009 issue of the American Journal of Pathology. B-cell lymphomas are the most frequent human immune system cancers.

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

Men largely make decisions about prostate cancer screening based on conversations with their clinicians, but these discussions often do not include information about the risks of testing in addition to the benefits, according to a report in the September 28 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

Prostate cancer patients of low socioeconomic status are more likely to die than patients with higher incomes. That is the finding of a new study from Swiss researchers to be published in the December 1, 2009 issue of Cancer, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study’s findings indicate that poor prostate cancer patients receive worse care than their wealthier counterparts.

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

The largest single-institution study of its kind has found few complications in prostate cancer patients treated with radiotherapy after surgery to remove the prostate. Men in this study received radiotherapy after a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test following surgery indicated their cancer had recurred.

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

Health care providers are twice as likely to discuss the benefits rather than the risks associated with PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) testing, despite national guidelines recommending full disclosure before screening, according to the results of national survey of men age 40 and older published in the September 28 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Mittwoch, September 30th, 2009 | Author:

Urology Centers of Alabama and the Wilcox County Health Department will sponsor a prostate cancer screening on Saturday, Oct. 10 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the health department located at 107 Union St. in Camden. In the past, more than 150 men have been provided free prostate screenings during the four-hour events. Prostate cancer is very treatable when detected early.