Archive for » 六月, 2013 «

星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

ALK rearrangement has been demonstrated to be a potent oncogenic driver and a promising therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). It defines a distinct molecular subset of NSCLC, in particular adenocarcinoma that can benefit by the treatment of ALK-inhibitors…

Category: lung cancer  | Leave a Comment
星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

The incidence of lung cancer in women affects an estimated 516,000 women worldwide, of which 100,000 are in the United States and 70,000 in Europe. Until now, lung cancers occurring in women have been treated similarly to lung cancers in men. However, numerous studies have highlighted different characteristics of lung cancer in women…

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星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

Each year, 13 percent of all newly diagnosed lung cancer patients are diagnosed with small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Approximately 39 percent of patients with SCLC are diagnosed with limited-stage disease, meaning the cancer is only present in one lung, but may have spread to lymph nodes or tissue between the lungs…

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星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

A Johns Hopkins study of more than 1,800 men ages 52 to 62 suggests that African-Americans diagnosed with very-low-risk prostate cancers are much more likely than white men to actually have aggressive disease that goes unrecognized with current diagnostic approaches…

星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

STOCKHOLM – Continuous ruxolitinib therapy extends survival over that seen with best available therapy (BAT) in patients with myelofibrosis and also provides durable reductions in splenomegaly, according to results released at the 18th Congress of the European Hematology Association (EHA)…

Category: lymphoma  | Leave a Comment
星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

Down syndrome, more commonly known as “trisomy 21″ is very often accompanied by pathologies found in the general population: Alzheimer’s disease, leukemia, or cardiac deficiency…

Category: lymphoma  | Leave a Comment
星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

Humans and their pet dogs are close, so close that they both develop a type of cancer called diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In humans it’s the most common lymphoma subtype while in dogs, it’s one of the most common cancers in veterinary oncology…

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星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-obligate precursor lesion of invasive carcinoma of the breast. Current prognostic markers based on histopathological examination are unable to accurately predict which DCIS cases will progress to invasive carcinoma or recur after surgical excision. Epigenetic changes have been shown to be a significant driver of tumorigenesis with DNA methylation of specific gene promoters providing predictive and prognostic markers in many types of cancer including invasive breast cancer. In general, the spectrum of genes that are methylated in DCIS strongly resembles that seen in invasive ductal carcinoma. The identification of specific prognostic markers in DCIS remains elusive and awaits more intensive work investigating a large panel of methylatable genes using sensitive and reproducible technologies. This review critically appraises the role of methylation in DCIS and its use as a biomarker.

星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

IntroductionLiver X receptors (LXRs) are members of the nuclear receptor family of ligand-dependent transcription factors and have established functions as regulators of cholesterol, glucose, and fatty acid metabolism and inflammatory responses. Published reports of anti-proliferative effects of synthetic LXR ligands on breast, prostate, ovarian, lung, skin, and colorectal cancer cells suggest that LXRs are potential targets in cancer prevention and treatment.
Methods:
To further determine the effects of LXR ligands and identify their potential mechanisms of action in breast cancer cells, we carried out microarray analysis of gene expression in four breast cancer cell lines following treatments with the synthetic LXR ligand GW3965. Differentially expressed genes were further subjected to gene ontology and pathway analyses, and their expression profiles and associations with disease parameters and outcomes were examined in clinical samples. Response of E2F target genes were validated by real-time PCR, and the posited role of E2F2 in breast cancer cell proliferation was tested by RNA interference experiments.
Results:
We observed cell line-specific transcriptional responses as well as a set of common responsive genes. In the common responsive gene set, up-regulated genes tend to function in the known metabolic effects of LXR ligands and LXRs whereas the down-regulated genes mostly include those which function in cell cycle regulation, DNA replication, and other cell proliferation-related processes. Transcription factor binding site analysis of the down-regulated genes revealed an enrichment of E2F binding site sequence motifs. Correspondingly, E2F2 transcript levels are down-regulated following LXR ligand treatment. Knock-down of E2F2 expression, similar to LXR ligand treatment, resulted in a significant disruption of estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cell proliferation. Ligand treatment also decreased E2F2 binding to cis-regulatory regions of target genes. Hierarchical clustering of breast cancer patients based on the expression profiles of the commonly down-regulated LXR ligand-responsive genes showed a strong association of these genes with patient survival.
Conclusions:
Taken together, these results indicate that LXR ligands target gene networks, including those regulated by E2F family members, are critical for tumor biology and disease progression and merit further consideration as potential agents in the prevention and treatment of breast cancers.

星期六, 六月 29th, 2013 | Author:

Proteins belonging to profilin-family of actin-binding proteins are considered to be important control elements for actin polymerization and have been linked to a broad spectrum of cellular functions including cell migration. An intriguing paper recently published in Cancer Cell unveils differential effects of profilin1 and profilin2, the two major isoforms of profilin, on actin cytoskeletal regulation, motility, and invasion of breast cancer cells, and further establishes a mechanism underlying profilin2′s suppressive effect on breast cancer cell migration. This viewpoint is to discuss the implications of these findings in the context of how profilins might regulate breast cancer cell motility.